Update Info

4/23/14  Today’s Haiku  (April 23, 2014) postedDolittle April 7 2014

My  new haiga site:  http://fayhaiga.wordpress.com

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Fay Aoyagi’s new book “Beyond the Reach of My Chopsticks” is now available! If you would like to order, please contact Fay (fayaoyagi [at] gmail.com). $15 including shipping; check and paypal* are accepted for payment. (*additional $1 will be charged for paypal payment.)

(replace [at] with @when sending me a mail).

Winners of Touchstone Book Award 2012 (Haiku Foundation) and Kanterman Award 2012 (Haiku Society of America)

faybook cover photo by Garry     (Cover photo by Garry Gay)

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1500th Haiku

EngBlog April 2013 for 1500thThank you for visiting my blog.

Today, I uploaded the 1500th haiku translation.

To celebrate the milestone (and I happen to be vacationing in Tokyo), I went to “Tobi Shrine.”   As some of you can tell from the photo above,  the character for “飛” for “Tobi” (which is also for my name “Fay”),  means ‘flying,’ and a visitor buys an amulet for a safe trip.

I continue this one haiku translation per day journey, hoping you will enjoy haiku by the poets from my home country.

Fay Aoyagi  from Tokyo

April 5, 2013

Tanka Translation 100th tanka uploaded!

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In January 2009, I started translating tanka from “Gendai Tanka no Kansho 101” (Apreciation of Modern Tanka 101), an anthology written and edited by Ken Kodaka.  It took longer than I thought, but I am happy to announce that the mission was completed at last!

Since I do not write tanka and some poets use classic Japanese, I found tanka translation more difficult than haiku translation.   From now on (at least for a while), this blog will concentrate on haiku. 

I appreciate your support and encouragement in the past 3 years! 

Fay Aoyagi

November 30, 2011, San Francisco

 

 

Today’s Haiku (April 23, 2014)

空が高いからこころに包帯巻いている  おおしろ建

sora ga takai kara kokoro ni hôtai maiteiru

            because the sky is high

            I have my heart

            bandaged

                                    Ken Ohshiro

from ‘Haidan,’ (‘Haiku Stage’) a monthly haiku magazine,  April 2013  Issue, Honami Shoten, Tokyo

 

Today’s Haiku (April 22, 2014)

April 22, 2014

春星や生まれ変はるなら男 小林菜穂

haruboshi ya umarekawaru nara otoko

            spring stars—

            in the next life I want to

            be born a man

                                    Naho Kobayashi

from ‘Haidan,’ (‘Haiku Stage’) a monthly haiku magazine,  July 2013  Issue, Honami Shoten, Tokyo

Today’s Haiku (April 21, 2014)

天皇が神だつた頃の花吹雪  無着成恭

tennô ga kami data koro no hanafubuki

            in the era when

            Emperor was God

            cherry blossom blizzard

                                                Seikyo Muchaku

from “Haiku Shiki” (“Haiku Four Seasons,” a monthly haiku magazine) ,  August 2012 Issue, Tokyo Shiki Shuppan, Tokyo

Today’s Haiku (April 20, 2014)

島行きの太き打厘や復活祭  荒井千佐代

shimayuki no ôki darin ya fukkatsusai

            deep sound of  a gong

            of the ship leaving for the island—

            Easter

                                    Chisayo Arai

from ‘Haiku,’ a monthly haiku magazine, April 2010 Issue, Kadokawa Gakugei Shuppan, Tokyo

Today’s Haiku (April 19, 2014)

春光に嘘ひとつなき馬ぞ立つ  横澤放川

shunkô ni uso hitotsu naki uma zo tatsu

            not a single lie

            in the spring light

            a horse stands up

                                                Housen Yokozawa

from ‘Haidan,’ (‘Haiku Stage’) a monthly haiku magazine,  May 2012  Issue, Honami Shoten, Tokyo

Today’s Haiku (April 18, 2014)

一生にまぶた一枚玉椿       山田耕司

isshô ni mabuta ichimai tamatsubaki

            one eyelid

            per life…

            camellia

                                    Koji Yamada

from “Chô-Shinsen 21” ,  (“Super New Selection 21,” an anthology of the haiku poets under 50-year-olds) edited by Bansei Tsukushi, Yasuko Tsushima, Leona Takayama, You-shorin, Nagano, Japan, December 2010

Fay’s Note:   “tamatsubaki,” (literal translation: “round camellia’), “himetsubaki’ (‘princess camellia’), or ‘chiyotsubaki’ (thousand-era camellia) is a poetic name for a camellia.